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A Poet Reflects

Posts tagged Anton Chekhov:

Life must be represented not as it is, but as it ought to be; as it appears in dreams.

Treplieff, in Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull (1896)

(Source: electrichoney)

My heart is full of you.

Nina, in Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull (1896)

(Source: electrichoney)

gypsji:

“Do you see that tree?  It is dead but it still sways in the wind with the others.  I think it would be like that with me.  That if I died I would still be part of life in one way or another.”

—Anton Chekhov, from The Three Sisters (1901)

(Source: feuille-d-automne)

Anton Chekhov’s death scene set in a German spa was later described by his wife, the actress Olga Knipper:
"After announcing that he was dying, [Anton] drank a full glass of champagne, lay on his left side, and stopped breathing.  In the silence, a large moth fluttered its wings against the light bulbs, and then the stillness was broken by the cork exploding from the champagne bottle."
—from the 2000 desk diary On Writers & Writing by Helen Sheehy & Leslie Stainton

Anton Chekhov’s death scene set in a German spa was later described by his wife, the actress Olga Knipper:

"After announcing that he was dying, [Anton] drank a full glass of champagne, lay on his left side, and stopped breathing.  In the silence, a large moth fluttered its wings against the light bulbs, and then the stillness was broken by the cork exploding from the champagne bottle."

—from the 2000 desk diary On Writers & Writing by Helen Sheehy & Leslie Stainton

“If you want to work on your art, work on your life.”
—Anton Chekhov

“If you want to work on your art, work on your life.”

—Anton Chekhov

You ask “What is life?” That is the same as asking “What is a carrot?” A carrot is a carrot and we know nothing more.

Anton Chekhov, letter to his wife, Olga Knipper Chekhov (April 20, 1904)

(Source: pornforblindmagazine, via corwood)

“To fear love is to fear life, and those whose fear life are already three parts dead …”
—Anton Chekhov

“To fear love is to fear life, and those whose fear life are already three parts dead …”

—Anton Chekhov

Life is a vexatious trap; when a thinking man reaches maturity and attains to full consciousness he cannot help feeling that he is in a trap from which there is no escape.

—Anton Chekhov (via elina-astra)